This is a legacy document, and retained on the site in order to avoid link rot. The content is likely no longer (a) accurate, (b) representative of the views and philosophies of current site management, or (c) up to date.

CSS Example: Blockquote

Blockquotes

In an effort to control the visual layout of web pages, many authors have adopted a set of tricks to ensure pixel-perfect control of the way a user views the documents they have crafted. These tricks include spacer.gifs, tables, frames, misuse of <BLOCKQUOTE> for indentation, and all the sundry attributes that browser manufacturers have thrown their way (hspace, marginwidth, frameborder, etc., etc. ad naseum).

With CSS and user style sheets, users can now specify the rendering of <BLOCKQUOTE> that they prefer.

These two elements designate quoted text. BLOCKQUOTE is for long quotations (block-level content) and Q is intended for short quotations (inline content) that don't require paragraph breaks. This example formats an excerpt from "The Two Towers", by J.R.R. Tolkien, as a blockquote.

They went in single file, running like hounds on a strong scent, and an eager light was in their eyes. Nearly due west the broad swath of the marching Orcs tramped its ugly slot; the sweet grass of Rohan had been bruised and blackened as they passed.

The example above is a nested <BLOCKQUOTE>. The quote about the use of <BLOCKQUOTE> is lengthy, so it was put into the default <BLOCKQUOTE> rendering from the site-wide style sheet. The background color and border for the inner <BLOCKQUOTE> are a result of inheritance from an additional style sheet linked in the <HEAD> section of this document (anthology.css). The standard style sheet takes precedence, since it was referenced last, but since it has no definition of style for nested <BLOCKQUOTE>, the nesting style from anthology.css is applied.

In developing the content for a poetry anthology, I discovered the beauty of <BLOCKQUOTE> used as it was intended: for long quotations. Some additional examples of the use of <BLOCKQUOTE> are linked below. The selections are part of the poetry anthology, and all use anthology.css for style declarations.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Robert Burns

John Burroughs

William Shakespeare

In an effort to control the visual layout of web pages, many authors have adopted a set of tricks to ensure pixel-perfect control of the way a user views the documents they have crafted. These tricks include spacer.gifs, tables, frames, misuse of <BLOCKQUOTE> for indentation, and all the sundry attributes that browser manufacturers have thrown their way (hspace, marginwidth, frameborder, etc., etc. ad naseum).

Sue Sims